Golden Axe Food Company.png

The Golden Axe Food Company was an agricultural company that used a magical Labyrinth to feed people to the Minotaur.

History

By using human sacrifices to the Minotaur, trapped in a Labyrinth powered by Minoan artifacts including Theseus's original thread, the Golden Axe Food Company was able to flourish, even through "war, famine, plague", for over 3000 years. By 2014, Karen Willis had modernized the sacrifice system, using interns as sacrifices and spreading them across a full year instead of killing them all at once. Along with using various shell companies and subsidiaries, this allowed the company to make it more difficult to track the missing interns back to them. When magic returned to the world, it increased the power of the sacrifices, giving them a higher than usual stock price bump with each one. Alerted to a suspicious string of missing interns by the Clippings book, the Librarians investigated the company. Ms. Willis managed to get them into the Labyrinth, but they escaped, and removed the thread powering the Labyrinth. The Minotaur was freed, and was last seen going after the executives for the company that had kept him imprisoned for millennia.[1]

Known employees

Appearances

The Librarians

Season 1

Trivia

  • The Golden Axe Food Company owns a large collection of rare Minoan artifacts which they used to focus the power of The Thread, creating the Labyrinth.
  • The Golden Axe Food Company sells products like engineered seeds to farmers.
  • In modern times the sacrifices helped Golden Axe by granting the company favorable returns in the stock market.
  • The spelling of 'Axe' is the British rather than American standard form, perhaps to emphasize its age.
  • The name "Golden Axe" is a reference to the Labrys, a double-headed axe that was the symbol of Crete, where King Minos ruled, and the source of the word "Labyrinth".
  • The company was inspired by the writers' background on the series Leverage, which was about a team of thieves working to take down corruption that was above the law. Evil corporations and CEOs were a frequent villain on that series, and when writer Jeremy Bernstein was coming up with ways to explore how magic was being used in the modern world, a corporation using it for "monstrous things" seemed like a likely idea.[2]

References

  1. Bernstein, Jeremy (writer) & Roskin, Marc (director) (December 14, 2014). "And the Horns of a Dilemma". The Librarians. Season 1. Episode 3. TNT.
  2. Rogers, John, Marc Roskin, and Jeremy Bernstein. Audio Commentary. "And the Horns of a Dilemma", The Librarians, season 1, episode 3, TNT, 2016.
Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.